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The Man Who Forgot Ray Bradbury

neilgaiman on June 07, 2012 17:54

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    To read Neil's blog - "Ray Bradbury" - from 2012.06.06, visit http://bit.ly/ngjRAY1
    To read his blog - "Ray Bradbury: In Memoriam and In Green Town Illinois" - posted in the evening of 2012.06.06, visit http://bit.ly/ngjRAY2

    This recording was released via the Kickstarter/fan-funded live album "An Evening With Neil Gaiman & Amanda Palmer" - additional info available at http://kck.st/pF2lMG
    Recorded on 2011.11.08 in Portland, OR at the Aladdin Theater.

    Written and Read by Neil Gaiman | @neilhimself

    Recorded, Mixed, and Mastered by Jaron Luksa | @JaronSound
    Original artwork by Cynthia von Buhler | @CynthVonBuhler
    Microphones furnished by Ear Trumpet Labs

    http://www.neilgaiman.com
    http://www.jaronsound.com
    http://www.cynthiavonbuhler.com
    http://www.eartrumpetlabs.com

    Released by: 8ft. music
    Release date: Apr 9, 2012

    26 Comments

    21 timed comments and 5 regular comments

    • John Massari Film Music
      John Massari Film Music at 4.20 on May 09, 2014 06:26

      What a wonderful work. I was music major at UCLA. It was then that I met Ray Bradbury. Ray would routinely visit the dormitories when we had impromptu all night sci-fi film marathon pajama parties. He would hang with us. Ray was a great motivational speaker. He would read some of his works and give us all pep talks on releasing our creative energy into our work. "Never stop swimming throughout the libraries, never stop learning something new." "Challenge yourself!" "Be on your best game!" We all grew up reading his stories and having him there mentoring us was more than we could ask for.

    • Brent Wiggins
      Brent Wiggins at 12.01 on April 20, 2014 03:51

      There Will Come Soft Rains...

    • Soupworkz
      Soupworkz at 9.24 on March 12, 2014 04:40

      this reminds me of my granny grunt....we miss u gran

    • Kevin Ekstrom
      Kevin Ekstrom at 13.32 on January 26, 2014 06:31

      Thank you Neil Gaiman, your words were lush and poignant a greater tribute I couldn't imagine. Mr. Bradbury, I hope you are strolling peacefully through the fields of many words, harvesting a new as the old drift slowly away.

    • Cedara
      Cedara at 12.43 on January 18, 2014 14:53

      Best poetic description for people with Alzheimers Disease - and more.

    • lrenee2014
      lrenee2014 at 5.07 on January 17, 2014 01:01

      lost my dad to Alzheimer's. this is soul-searing. lovely.

    • Lila Cyclist
    • Speculativism
      Speculativism at 9.13 on November 07, 2013 20:43

      So many references.... Wonderful. This made me remember that it was in Dark They Were and Golden Eyed in Bedfordbury from Bram Stokes and Diane that I first bought "The Martian Chronicles" and "Something Wicked This Way Comes"... Thanks for memory...

    • tenlockedthetardis
      tenlockedthetardis at 0.04 on September 10, 2013 23:08

      He has the best speaking voice ever.

    • pmcds
      pmcds at 5.46 on August 12, 2013 18:05

      I lost a person the other day. Embarrassing as it was in front of them. They reminded me, I apologised, and I feel ashamed to say I've forgotten it again!

    • Why-Lie Speaks
      Why-Lie Speaks at 6.48 on May 28, 2013 17:41

      STOP.... & plz watch my new video LIFE- an evil crow... Why not? U have nothing to lose :p
      http://t.co/9nswZNUpZW

    • LL108
    • Mikey Gee 1
      Mikey Gee 1 at 0.14 on October 15, 2012 14:14

      I want to thank Mr. Gaiman for this wonderful gift to Mr. Bradbury. Ray's writing has a very special place in my life and I am touched to know that he has had the same influence on Niel.

    • lindes
      lindes at 3.33 on August 23, 2012 07:51

      I think if ever I was to get a tattoo, it would be somewhere I could easily find it, and it would simply be the word: dysnomia.

    • VirginCavalier
    • Dr.Nemmo
      Dr.Nemmo on July 28, 2012 05:00

      Dear Neil:

      I listened to this piece and it brought tears to my eyes. That was pretty unexpected, given the fact that I listen to sad things almost every day, being a psychiatrist. You brought a lot of memories when I was a kid and I read for the first time the Martian Chronicles, and I thank you for that.

      I wanted to share your story with my wife but she doesn't speak english. So I decided to translate The Man Who Forgot Ray Bradbury into spanish. I know, I know, "Omnis traductor traditor", but I swear it is the last of my intentions to betray the meaning of your work. I put special attention to the tenses of the words you chose, but then I listened to what you read and decided to follow your voice instead of sticking to the letter.

      This is your work and it was a great gift to hear it and then read it, so I wanted to give it back to you in my language. I'll take as a task to remember this story and become it so your name isn't forgotten when the firemen come.

      Here's the text and a hug from my wife and me:

      http://drnemmo.tumblr.com

    • Laura McMaster
      Laura McMaster at 9.23 on June 23, 2012 09:23

      This part is so powerful, so evocative and amazing, I replayed it about 10 times before moving forward. I'd give a lot to go back in time and be in that audience. Absolutely amazing.

    • cloudybob
      cloudybob on June 20, 2012 17:12

      Ray Bradbury's work has always been inspirational and entertaining, especially for me - a real space-age kid of the 60s... I'll miss his bright mind and intellect shining from the printed page.
      Thanks, Neil for that wonderfully evocative reading and a story I can indeed empathise with. Memory was how my dear ol' Irish Mom first revealed her troubles with dementia. It led to
      her giving up reading, a loss I'm sure she regretted very deeply in her last years. She treasured her lifelong reading habit. I'll always treasure mine.
      People like Ray and Neil are our saviours, giving of themselves and their imaginations. Thank you both.

    • Mythobeast
      Mythobeast at 3.38 on June 18, 2012 21:41

      This is a powerful description of aphasia. Sometimes it takes me a long time to remember a word, like aphasia or eccentric, but that's not even close to not being able to remember a word I know I know.

    • Eggtimer
      Eggtimer at 13.42 on June 12, 2012 13:31

      Minneapolis and Grenoble near the centre

    • Eggtimer
    • Joseph DiCristofano
      Joseph DiCristofano on June 12, 2012 00:24

      Storytellers are meant to dispatch a modicum of wisdom while infusing the world with a dose of much needed magic. Ray Bradbury did that in spades.

    • Robin The Fog
      Robin The Fog on June 11, 2012 08:32

      Good grief, I'm actually welling up. Damn you, Neil Gaiman! I'm at WORK!!!

    • thoughtstorms
      thoughtstorms on June 09, 2012 18:52

      (My "blurb" for sharing to Facebook.): Have you ever experienced the loss of someone - and you wish you could say the perfect thing about them, but alas, nothing worthy comes to you? Ever lost someone that means the world to you, and for some reason the tears fail to turn up? Even if Ray Bradbury was nothing to you (and i dearly hope that isn't the case - and that if it is the case you change that simply by paying 15 cents at a garage sale or book resale shop!) - but even if you have no idea who the man is (present tense intentional) - take a little time to listen to this story. And if Mr. Bradbury means the world to you as he does to me, the tears are likely to arrive: welcome guests to help you grieve but more - to help you celebrate a dear friend. A friend to any bookshop pedestrian with a dime and a nickel and a sense of curiosity. Thank you Neil, and Ray and all the authors that helped build a childhood, a mind and a grateful person. Thank you.

    • megibralto
    • Ayesha Powell
      Ayesha Powell at 2.05 on June 09, 2012 07:22

      He taught me words when I was little.I was a strange child.Someone who would grow up to read Good Omens.

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