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NEWTON'S MUSICK DOGMAN DEMO

DOGMAN aka DAVID SANDS on January 18, 2013 17:57

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THIS IS A VERY ROUGH 'DOGMAN' DEMO FOR A SONG I WAS INSPIRED TO WRITE BY COMMENTS FROM DICK (OORLAB).

LYRICS BELOW

Sir Isaac Newton (1642 – 1727) was the greatest mind ever born to England. He was true scientist with an inquisitive mind, interested in Natural World.
From a review online:

‘While the world knows of his immense contributions to optics and gravitation, one is staggered at the thought of the time he spent on less productive efforts. The rough estimate based on one sale catalogue, the Portsmouth Collection, Cambridge, indicates a million and a half words on theology and chronology; half a million words on alchemy and one hundred fifty thousand words on problems of coinage and the Mint. And he also wrote on mathematics, chemistry, astronomy and of course philosophy.
Newton’s earliest scientific interest in music lay in the mathematical division of the octave, a subject which first appears in a notebook from his college days. The reader must remember that the modern system of tuning became only generally known during Newton’s lifetime, replacing several tuning systems which all differed in their calculation of the whole and half-steps, as these intervals are not consistent in the overtone series. Thus in this early notebook, dating c. 1665, one finds a study of the modes, as well as a logarithmic comparison of a scale divided into twelve equal parts with an equally tempered one’.

‘In a letter, Newton enclosed a graph, showing the correlation of the basic colors with relative notes of music. Regrettably, although he discusses in detail the relationships of the colours relative to this graph, he does not offer here a precise description of their correspondence to music. Nevertheless, Newton remained interested in this topic and he discusses it again in the publication of his Opticks in 1704. Whatever was Newton’s private understanding on this subject we are left in some doubt. To his correspondents who wanted more information, he would sometimes apologize that with regard to music, “I have not so much skill in that science as to understand it well.”

'From his studies of optics, Newton had made important discoveries relative to light waves, establishing their speed and that they moved in straight lines. We may assume that he was at least casually thinking of the correspondence of these laws with musical sound waves as well, or so a letter to John North in 1677 suggests. North had sent Newton a new treatise on music by his elder brother, Francis, for review and Newton makes extensive corrections regarding the nature and direction of sound waves, as well as on the relationships between vibrating strings. At length, Newton evidently tired and signed off.'

'The discourse also about breaking of tones into higher notes seems very ingenious and judicious, but I lack experience to discern whether altogether solid, & much follows about Tunes, the scale of Music, & consorts; this requiring a combination of musical & mathematical skill, & therefore I shall content myself with having thus far animadverted upon the author.'

'A letter to Oldenburg in June, 1672, is concerned with Newton’s answering objections by Robert Hooke to some of his theories. One sentence is of particular interest, as it demonstrates that Newton correctly understood that music is in the vibrations, not in the instrument -- a topic still much under discussion by some writers.'

'But when Mr. Hooke would insinuate a difficulty in these things by alluding to sounds in the string of a musical instrument before percussion, or in the Air of an Organ bellows before its arrival at the pipes, I must confess I understand it as little as if he had spoken of light in a piece of wood before it be set on fire....'

'Newton’s correspondence reveals his interest in other topics related to music and sound. An early letter of 1669 informs an unknown friend,
Another useful instrument lately invented here, is Sir Samuel Morelands loud speaking Trumpett, of which he has written a book or history with the title Tuba Stentorophonica, value one shilling, by which persons may discourse at about a mile and a half distance, if not more.'

'And in yet another letter, Newton reveals he has received a request for information about an ear-trumpet for the deaf. Newton mentions such a device made “after the form of Mr. Mace’s tocoustion,” draws a picture of it, reports it comes in several sizes and that he has heard, “the biggest do ye best.”
No doubt due in part to his own unsatisfactory experience in school, Newton wrote a brief treatise, “Of Educating Youth in the Universities,” although the work was left unpublished during his lifetime. It is of interest to read here what an ideal university curriculum was to Newton and we take it as a testimonial to his lack of awareness of his own genius that he proposes a curriculum that probably no one else could emerge from as a graduate in four years. We also find it extraordinary to discover him still listing music as a subject to be taught by the mathematics professor!’

Newton’s Musick

© 2013 dogman songs

Can you hear it Newton’s delight

Major 6th here Rays of light

Sounds shades Bound in waves

Seven spectral vibrating octaves

In the ether in the air Newton is there

Can you hear A new Progression

Bound in waves vibrate in heaven

in Wavelengths visions extreme

Mathematic sounds Newton’s dream

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