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Supernova Sonata

alexhp on May 28, 2011 20:35

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    From April, 2003 until August, 2006, the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope watched four parts of the sky as often as possible. Armed with the largest digital camera in the known universe, CFHT monitored these four fields for a special type of supernova (called Type Ia) which are created by the thermonuclear detonation of one or more white-dwarf stars. These explosions are extremely energetic, and can be seen across vast distances in space. These four fields covered roughly 16 times the area of the full Moon on the sky, or roughly 1/10,000 of the entire sky. Even though such a small fraction of the sky was monitored, 241 Type Ia supernovae were seen during the period of observation.

    This sonata is a compilation of the 241 Type Ia supernovae seen in these fields during the CFHT Legacy Survey. The track is rendered such that one second in of audio corresponds to roughly two weeks of real time.

    Each supernova is assigned a note to be played:

    The volume of the note is determined by the distance to the supernova, with more distant supernova being quieter and fainter.

    The pitch of the note was determined by the supernova's "stretch," a property of how the supernova brightens and fades. Higher stretch values played higher notes. The pitches were drawn from a Phrygian dominant scale.

    The instrument the note was played on was determined by the properties of the galaxy which hosted each supernova. Supernovae hosted by massive galaxies are played with a stand-up bass, while supernovae hosted by less massive galaxies are played with a grand piano.

    "Supernova Sonata" by alexhp is licensed under a Creative Commons License

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